St George’s Day Celebration

Staff in the school marked St George’s Day by dressing in ‘red and white’ and the Catering staff made special cupcakes for the lunchtime dessert.

On St. George’s Day, Year 7 pupils went on a trip to Buckingham Palace to witness the Changing of the Guards. Despite the bustling crowd, they were fortunate enough to catch a glimpse of the Guards on their horses, fortunately not the ones that unseated their riders, as well as enjoy the musical procession of the bandsmen. Afterwards, the pupils enjoyed a picnic in Hyde Park and concluded the day racing on pedalos.

Below are some facts (that you may not have known) about St George, which we all shared with our classes throughout the day:

Although St George is the Patron Saint of England (and many other countries), he never actually set foot in England. He became a legendary figure in English history during the Crusades, due to his courage and bravery. The country adopted him as its Patron Saint, with April 23 being chosen as the date of celebration to mark his death.

ST GEORGE WASN’T ENGLISH…
St George might be hailed as a national hero, but he was actually born – in the 3rd century AD – more than 2,000 miles away in Cappadocia (modern day Turkey).

AND HE WASN’T A KNIGHT EITHER
Although George is often depicted in popular culture as a knight in shining armour, it is more likely that he was an officer in the Roman army.

ST GEORGE WAS A MARTYR.

Like many saints, St George was described as a martyr after he died for his Christian faith. It is believed that, George was executed for refusing to make a sacrifice in honour of the Pagan gods.

AND HE NEVER VISITED ENGLAND.
Although St George never visited England, his reputation for virtue and holiness spread across Europe and his feast day – the 23rd April – was celebrated in England from the 9th century onwards. He became popular with English Kings. The St George Cross was not used to represent England until the reign of Henry VIII.

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